clutch

I UK [klʌtʃ] / US verb
Word forms "clutch":
present tense I/you/we/they clutch he/she/it clutches present participle clutching past tense clutched past participle clutched
**
a) [transitive] to hold someone or something firmly, for example because you are afraid or in pain, or do not want to lose them

Women clutched small children as they left.

b) [intransitive] to try to take hold of someone or something because you are afraid or in pain, or in order to stop yourself from falling
clutch at:

An officer stumbled and clutched at the handrail.

See:
straw

II UK [klʌtʃ] / US noun
Word forms "clutch":
singular clutch plural clutches
*
1) [countable] a piece of equipment in a vehicle that you press with your foot when you change gear
2) [singular] a firm hold that you have on someone or something, usually because you are afraid or in pain, or do not want to lose them
3) [countable] a set of eggs that a chicken produces at one time, or the chickens that come from those eggs
4) clutches
[plural] power or control that someone has over you that you want to escape from

They fled the country to escape the clutches of the secret police.

5) [countable] a small group of people or things

This is the best of the recent clutch of political biographies.


English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Clutch — Жанры Стоунер рок Хардкор Хард рок Фанк метал Блюз рок Годы 1990 настоящее время …   Википедия

  • Clutch — Clutch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Clutched} (kl[u^]cht); p. pr. & vb. n. {Clutching}.] [OE. clucchen. See {Clutch}, n.] 1. To seize, clasp, or grip with the hand, hands, or claws; often figuratively; as, to clutch power. [1913 Webster] A man may set… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Clutch — (kl[u^]ch; 224), n. [OE. cloche, cloke, claw, Scot. clook, cleuck, also OE. cleche claw, clechen, cleken, to seize; cf. AS. gel[ae]ccan (where ge is a prefix) to seize. Cf. {Latch} a catch.] 1. A gripe or clinching with, or as with, the fingers… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Clutch — en concierto en Minneapolis, 2007 Datos generales Origen Germantown, Maryland …   Wikipedia Español

  • clutch — clutch1 or clutch bag [kluch] vt. [ME clucchen < OE clyccan, to clench (infl. in meaning by ME cloke, a claw) < IE * glek (> CLING) < base * gel : see CLIMB] 1. to grasp, seize, or snatch with a hand or claw 2. to grasp or hold… …   English World dictionary

  • clutch — ‘seize’ [14] and clutch of eggs [18] are separate words, although they may ultimately be related. The verb arose in Middle English as a variant of the now obsolete clitch, which came from Old English clyccan ‘bend, clench’. The modern sense of… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • clutch — clutch·man; de·clutch; un·clutch; clutch; …   English syllables

  • clutch — ‘seize’ [14] and clutch of eggs [18] are separate words, although they may ultimately be related. The verb arose in Middle English as a variant of the now obsolete clitch, which came from Old English clyccan ‘bend, clench’. The modern sense of… …   Word origins

  • Clutch — Clutch, v. i. 1. To reach (at something) as if to grasp; to catch or snatch; often followed by at. [1913 Webster] 2. to become too tense or frightened to perform properly; used sometimes with up; as, he clutched up on the exam. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • clutch — vb grasp, grab, *take, seize, snatch Analogous words: capture, *catch: hold, *have, possess, own clutch n *hold, grip, grasp Analogous words: seizing, grabbing, taking (see TAKE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • clutch — [n] strong hold clamp, clasp, clench, clinch, connection, coupling, grapple, grasp, grip, gripe, link; concept 190 clutch [v] grab, snatch catch, cherish, clasp, clench, clinch, cling to, collar, embrace, fasten, glom*, grapple, grasp, grip,… …   New thesaurus

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